Self-Care for Family Caregivers

Date: August 7th, 2019

Filed under: Tips

Did you know that in general, people who act as family caregivers are less likely than others to practice self-care? As a caregiver, one of the most important things you can do for both yourself and the person you’re caring for is to take good care of yourself.

Take Care of Your Own Health

Caring for someone else doesn’t mean your own health should take a back seat. Be sure to make regular doctor’s appointments for yourself, and talk to your physician about any concerns you have. Set goals to take care of your own basic needs, like eating nutritious meals and snacks, getting enough sleep, and exercising.

Practice Stress-Reduction Techniques

Caregiving can be stressful, taking a toll on your mental, emotional, and physical health. Learn and apply techniques like meditation, yoga, and mindfulness to keep yourself centered. Other options to help you relax could include coloring, journaling, taking a bath, or scheduling a power nap into your day.

Do Something You Love

Your personal happiness has a huge effect on your quality of life and the level of care you are able to give to others, so make time to do things that you enjoy. Go to lunch with a friend, spend time on your favorite hobby, or treat yourself to something special.

Ask for Help

The burden of caregiving can be lightened when you share it with others. Family and friends are often willing to help, but may not know what to do. Making specific requests—such as asking someone to make a meal or run a few errands—can make your day more manageable. You may also want to consider professional help. It’s an investment, but it can come with significant benefits to your well-being.

Take time off

It’s important to give yourself a break from the demands of caregiving. Make arrangements to have someone else take care of your loved one for a while so you can have some time off. You’ll come back feeling refreshed and more able to cope with your caregiving responsibilities.

Self-care is a vital part of being a family caregiver. Taking care of yourself allows you to be a better caregiver to your loved one, stay healthy, and enjoy all that life has to offer.

Three Common Myths About Counseling

Date: July 19th, 2019

Filed under: Counseling

Counseling is a form of therapy that has wide-reaching benefits for all kinds of people and situations. However, common myths about counseling may keep you from even considering this option as you try to make improvements in your life and relationships. Recognizing these misconceptions can help you better understand the benefits of counseling—for everyone.

Myth 1: Counseling is only for people with a mental illness or serious problem

Counseling is all about growth and development—which means this type of therapy can be helpful for anyone. Although counseling is an effective treatment for most mental health conditions, the reality is that it can help people to deal with many types of problems. Counseling can help you strengthen your relationships, adjust to significant life changes like moving or changing jobs, reduce stress, and develop a more positive outlook on life. Counseling is less about 'cure' or 'fixing' and more about using the therapeutic relationship to 're-parent' yourself and learn how to appreciate and love yourself, while improving the way you manage the ups and downs of life.

Myth 2: Seeking counseling is a sign of weakness

Nothing could be further from the truth. Seeking counseling is a sign of strength, wisdom, and good self-care. If you have a medical question or concern that has to do with your physical body, it’s natural to go to your doctor. In the same way, it is just as appropriate to seek help from a counselor or therapist if you want to improve your mental and emotional health.

Myth 3: Counseling will make me dependent on my therapist

The goal of any good therapist is to help you progress. During your sessions, the clinician's job is to help you identify the positive changes you want to make in your life, better understand how the different components of your life interact, and develop tools to make improvements happen. In this way, your counselor is actually helping you to be more independent. The techniques you learn in counseling can often be applied in many different aspects of life, and most people find that therapy is an investment with far-reaching benefits.

Tips for Sleeping Well This Summer

Date: July 4th, 2019

Filed under: Sleep

If you’re having trouble getting enough Z’s this summer, you can probably blame it on one of three things: climbing temperatures, an unbalanced diet, or the long hours of daylight that can disrupt your usual schedule. Try these tips to make sure you’re sleeping well this summer.

Temperature

It’s hard to drift off to sleep in a stuffy bedroom. If you have air conditioning, take advantage of it to cool off your room before you settle down for the night. If you don’t have AC, there are still steps you can take to make your nights more comfortable. Try changing out your sheets and blankets for lightweight, natural materials that breathe well, and use layers so you can easily add or throw off a blanket during the night. Use a fan for air circulation, and open the windows in the early mornings when it’s cool so the air in your room doesn’t get stale.

Diet

Ice cream in the heat of the afternoon and a cocktail in the evening may taste good at the time, but sugar and alcohol can send all the wrong signals to your body when it’s time to unwind. It’s fine to indulge in treats occasionally, but make sure the bulk of your diet is whole grains, leafy greens, fruits and veggies, and healthy proteins. Summer is a great time to enjoy in-season produce that may not be readily available at other times, like cherries, peaches, and blueberries. A healthy smoothie can take care of your milkshake fix without disrupting your sleep.

Summer Schedule

When it stays light outside until eight or nine pm, it can be tempting to stay out later. There’s nothing wrong with enjoying a little extra daylight. Usually the problem arises when you come home as it starts to get dark and then stay up for another few hours watching TV or scrolling through social media. Because you’re used to unwinding for a couple of hours after you get home during the colder months, this habit can carry over into the summer and lead to some very late nights. Aim to be in bed at a reasonable time, and spend half an hour or so before bedtime doing a relaxing, screen-free activity.

If you’re still having trouble sleeping and have ruled out temperature, diet, and a disrupted schedule, the problem may be stress or anxiety. Schedule an appointment with a member of our team if you’re continuing to have sleep concerns. We can help you address any underlying problems and get back on track for a restful eight hours a night.

Tips for Summertime Self-Care

Date: June 24th, 2019

Filed under: Tips

We all know it’s important to practice good self-care in the winter, when rain and cold weather can make us feel a little blue, but we also need to nurture ourselves in the warmer months. Try these four tips for summertime self-care to take full advantage of the rejuvenating effects summer can offer.

Get Outside

Spending time outdoors is a great way to relax, reconnect with yourself and the world around you, and enjoy the beauties of nature. The sunny days of summer are the perfect time to get outside and allow yourself to unwind. Whether you decide to hike, visit a swimming hole, or just sit in the park with a good book, spending time outside can refresh you and help you to feel centered.

Play

Summertime seems to bring out the kid in all of us. Embrace the spontaneity and relaxed atmosphere by channeling your inner child: Run through the sprinkler, have a water fight with your family, go for a bike ride, play games you enjoyed in your childhood. Making time to have fun and be with friends and family is a huge mood-booster and allows you to create memories you can look back on in the future.

Take a Tech Break

Try setting aside one day a week this summer to unplug. Turn off the TV, step away from the computer, and don’t touch the iPhone. Find technology-free ways to keep your hands busy and engage your brain. Doing so will give you the freedom to focus on what you want to with far fewer distractions.

Wake Up Early

It may seem counterintuitive to take care of yourself by getting up early instead of sleeping in, but the quiet of early morning can be especially soothing. Use the cool of the morning to enjoy a cup of tea, potter around in the garden, or soak up the sun for a bit before it gets too hot. Having just a few minutes to yourself before anyone else is awake can give you the perfect start to your day.

Summertime is all about taking time to unwind, relax, and have fun. By focusing some of your energy each day on practicing self-care, you can make this summer a season to nurture yourself physically, mentally, and emotionally.

How to Tell the Difference Between Stress and an Anxiety Disorder

Date: June 10th, 2019

Filed under: Anxiety

Stress and anxiety are closely related issues, and both can take a toll on your mental and physical health. But how can you tell when you’re experiencing stress and when you might need to seek help for an anxiety disorder? Because stress and anxiety are so closely related and produce such similar symptoms, it can be tricky to tell the difference between them. A good rule of thumb to determine whether what you’re experiencing qualifies as stress or an anxiety disorder is to look at what is causing negative emotions in your life.

Stress is generally caused by external factors—homework piling up, financial difficulties, trouble at work, etc. It’s the natural response of the body to a perceived threat, and can be expected to dissipate once the problem is resolved. If you can identify a specific reason for your symptoms, the likelihood is that you’re dealing with stress.

Anxiety, on the other hand, has different root causes. Although it can be triggered by stress, the worries and fears caused by anxiety are often not associated with an actual threat and may be exaggerated beyond what is likely to happen. Because anxiety isn’t caused by external factors, it doesn’t go away when your circumstances change. If you have feelings of dread or apprehension that won’t go away and don’t have an identifiable cause, it may be a signal that you’re suffering from an anxiety disorder.

Stress and anxiety disorders, while similar in many ways, are different, but both can be hard to deal with. The good news is that they are both very susceptible to treatment. If you can’t determine if you have stress or an anxiety disorder, or if negative emotions are making it difficult for you to function in day-to-day life, it’s a good idea to see a professional. They can help you to tell the difference between stress and an anxiety disorder, and suggest a course of treatment that can put your life back on track.

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Contact Oregon Counseling

To request an appointment please complete the form below. Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment. After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule an appointment. Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider these emergency options:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • call 911
  • Go to your nearest emergency room.
  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

Contact Information

SE Portland Location

10011 SE Division Street,
Suite 202
Portland, OR 97266

503-928-3998

Monday to Friday: 7:00am - 8:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am - 3:00pm

Corvallis Location

887 NW Grant Ave
Corvallis, OR 97330

541-714-5620

Monday to Friday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am - 4:00pm

Eugene Location

401 E 10th Ave,
Suite 330
Eugene, OR 97401

514-868-2004

Monday to Friday: 8:00am - 8:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am - 3:00pm

https://www.eugenetherapy.com/