Ways to Simplify Holiday Gift-Giving

Date: December 2nd, 2019

Filed under: Holidays

Simple holiday gift in woman's hands with holiday decor

Giving and receiving gifts is something many people look forward to during the holidays. But the pressure to spend money, the worry of figuring out the perfect gift for everyone on your list, and the hassle of fighting crowds can make the traditional gift exchange more stressful than joyful. If you’re feeling anxious about your holiday to-do list, then finding ways to simply holiday gift-giving may be the answer.

Talk About It

If you’re thinking of scaling back, it’s a good idea to talk about it with your family members so that everyone knows what to expect. Talking about your reasons for simplifying the holidays can help your family and friends understand that reducing the gift-giving will help everyone to have a more enjoyable season. You’ll get to spend more time together, stress less, and reduce clutter.

Set a Budget

It’s easy to go overboard during the holidays. Before you start purchasing, make a plan and set a budget so that you can stay within your means while celebrating. Setting a budget can help you prioritize which gifts to buy and reduce financial worry both during and after the holidays.

Gift Homemade Items

Personalize your gift-giving by creating handmade items for your loved ones. If you enjoy woodworking, are handy with a needle, or love to bake, you may be able to create gifts from scratch, with only minimal trips to the store. And these creative outlets are certainly not the limit. Think about your hobbies and talents and see if you can put them to use in creating a thoughtful homemade gift.

Gift Experiences

Not all gifts have to be physical items. You can simplify the holidays (and clutter) by giving your loved ones experiences they would enjoy. Whether it’s a manicure, horseback riding lessons, a trip to the movies, skydiving, or a family retreat, experiences may be the most cherished and lasting gifts you can give.

Gift Exchange Ideas

There are many ways to divvy up the gift-giving. Drawing names, white elephant, a rotating gift box, treasure hunt, choosing themed gifts, using wish lists—there are a myriad of options. If your family is open to it, you might even forgo a family gift exchange and instead pool your resources together for a family experience (as mentioned above), or donate your gift money to charity.

Simplifying gift-giving can actually make your holiday celebrations more meaningful, not less. As you and your family figure out your favorite ways to simplify gift-giving, you’ll find that it’s one of the best ways to keep holiday stress at bay, develop new traditions, focus on what’s important, and create memories together.

7 Ways to Develop an Attitude of Gratitude

Date: November 19th, 2019

Filed under: Mental Health

Older woman showing Attitude of Gratitude by smiling

As we discussed in our last post, “4 Benefits of Gratitude,” having a grateful attitude can help you to be happier and healthier in many ways. But how do you cultivate the characteristic of gratitude in order to reap those benefits? In this post, we’ll go over seven simple things that can help you to develop an attitude of gratitude.

Express thanks out loud every day.

If you’re religious, you might do this through prayer. If you don’t adhere to a particular religion, you can simply express thanks to the universe for the things that make you happy.

Say thank you to people around you.

Chances are, people do things for you every day, and recognizing those things can help you develop greater appreciation for them. Thank your spouse for running an errand; say thank you to the cashier at checkout; a stranger who opens the door for you; your coworkers for doing their jobs.

Give compliments.

Along with saying thank you, complimenting people can also help you develop gratitude for them and the good traits they have. Try to be observant and notice something you like about another person—then share it.

Thank yourself.

Remember to acknowledge gratitude toward yourself as well. At the end of the day, thank yourself for the things you accomplished and for trying to be the best person you can be.

Be a good steward.

Taking good care of what you have can make you more grateful. You can take care of your body by eating right and exercising; your possessions by using them carefully and maintaining them; or your relationships by making time to connect with the people you love.

Do something to make someone else happy

Pick up a treat for someone to let them know you’re thinking about them. Play a game with your kids. Do a chore that is usually your partner’s responsibility. Focusing your attention on making others happy will reflect back on you, bringing greater happiness and gratitude into your life as you bring good things into the lives of those around you.

Keep a gratitude journal.

Take a few minutes each day to reflect on something you’re grateful for, and record it. You may choose to keep a personal diary, or you may prefer to share the spirit of gratitude by posting the things you’re grateful for on social media.

As you make a habit of recognizing and acknowledging the good things in your life, you’ll find that you notice more and more things that spark gratitude. And as you develop an attitude of gratitude, you’ll find that your life becomes happier, healthier, and more abundant.

4 Benefits of Gratitude

Date: November 6th, 2019

Filed under: Mental Health

“Count your blessings” may have become a trite phrase, but there’s wisdom in the cliché. Research has shown that developing an attitude of gratitude can have positive benefits in nearly every area of our lives. Cultivating the characteristic of gratitude is something anyone can do to improve their satisfaction with life, their interactions with others, and even their general health. Here are just four of the many benefits of gratitude.

Gratitude is Good for Your Relationships

Showing appreciation and a positive attitude makes others want to be around you. Whether you’re at home, work, or among strangers, saying thank you and acknowledging the contributions of others makes you stand out. Studies indicate that showing gratitude can strengthen your current relationships and even pave the way to build new relationships.

Gratitude is Good for Your Self-Esteem

Gratitude makes you less likely to compare yourself to others. A grateful attitude makes it easier for you to appreciate what you have, and to feel happy for others when they experience something good in their lives. Characteristics like these help you to feel good about yourself and improve your sense of self-worth.

Gratitude is Good for Your Mood

Grateful people tend to be happier and feel more optimistic. This may be partly because gratitude reduces feelings like envy, resentment, stress, and frustration—feelings that can cause us emotional discomfort. Gratitude can even ease mental health conditions like depression and anxiety—although you should always seek professional help for these types of mental health conditions if you feel you need it.

Gratitude is Good for Your Resilience

People with higher levels of gratitude are better able to cope with difficulties that life throws their way. Being grateful increases mental and emotional strength, allowing you to withstand hard times and recover from trauma.

Gratitude has a host of other benefits too, from better sleep to more positive social behaviors. No matter what your situation, cultivating a sense of gratitude (which we'll cover in our next post) can help you to experience greater happiness and better mental, physical, and emotional health.

How to Help Your Child Have a Happy Halloween

Date: October 23rd, 2019

Filed under: Holidays

Halloween Pumpkins in Oregon

Plenty of kids look forward to Halloween as a time to dress up, stay out late with friends, and create a stockpile of candy. But that’s not the case for every child. If your kiddo experiences anxiety, struggles to follow directions, or doesn’t like surprises, this holiday can be more of a trick than a treat to handle. Fortunately, there are things you can do to help your child feel happy, safe, and comfortable this Halloween.

Halloween Costumes

Not all children enjoy dressing up. Sometimes unfamiliar clothing causes more stress than fun, and wearing a mask or makeup can be frightening or irritating for some kiddos. If your child wants to wear a costume, help them to pick out something they feel comfortable in—and if they don’t want to dress up, that’s okay too!

Halloween Fears

It isn’t always easy for young children to distinguish between what’s real and what isn’t. Ghoulish masks, grinning skeletons, oversized spiders, makeup gore, and scary sound effects may not feel like fun and games to your child. Try to prepare your kiddo in advance by reminding them that none of the scary things they might see are real, or just avoid most of the thrills and chills altogether.

Trick-or-Treating and Parties

If you think the excitement of Halloween may overstimulate your child, it’s a good idea to go over expectations beforehand. Let your child know what they can expect from the evening and what rules they need to adhere to. You may want to celebrate early in the evening and then come home to the usual bedtime routine so you can end the night on a familiar note.

Remember, not everyone’s Halloween has to look the same, so if your child prefers to stay home and make goody bags for their friends rather than dressing up and trick-or-treating, that’s perfectly fine. Halloween can be fun for your child when they know what to expect and when they have a say in how they will celebrate.

First Date Ideas for Singles with Anxiety

Date: October 8th, 2019

Filed under: Relationships

First dates can be anxiety-inducing for anybody, but they can be particularly difficult if you struggle with anxiety on a regular basis. Spending time with someone you don’t know well, keeping up a conversation, making a good impression—it can all feel overwhelming. But dating gives you a chance to make friends, try new things, and maybe even find romance, all of which are great for your mental and emotional health. So before you decide to stay in with a movie and a tub of ice cream, give one of these low-stress date ideas a try.

Double Date

Having others around to share the talking can help you relax and enjoy yourself, rather than spending the entire evening trying to avoid the dreaded “awkward silence.”

Skip Dinner and Catch the Show

Dinner and a movie may have the advantage of being tried-and-true, but making small talk, deciding on what to order, and eating in front of someone else can all amp up your anxiety. Plan to see the show, and if you feel like grabbing dessert afterwards, the movie provides a built-in conversation starter.

Volunteer

Focusing on something besides your partner while on a date might seem counterintuitive, but keeping busy can actually help both of you to open up, talk naturally, and maybe even have a few laughs. Plus it’s a great opportunity to help others and find out what causes your date is passionate about.

Board Games

If you’re looking for an evening in, a game night can be a fun and simple way for the two of you to get to know each other in a fun, low-pressure environment.

Attend an Interesting Event or Location

Festivals, plays, art museums, zoos—they all provide an interesting backdrop to your date. If it’s a new experience for both of you, so much the better. The two of you can share something new together and use the novel experience to jumpstart the conversation if it starts to flag.

While first dates aren’t easy for people with anxiety, choosing a low-stress activity can make it more likely that you’ll enjoy them. If your anxiety makes dating or relationships challenging, consider talking to one of our counselors or therapists. They can help you learn how to manage your anxiety so you can get to know others in fulfilling ways.

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Contact Oregon Counseling

To request an appointment please complete the form below. Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment. After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule an appointment. Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider these emergency options:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • call 911
  • Go to your nearest emergency room.
  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

Contact Information

SE Portland Location

10011 SE Division Street,
Suite 202
Portland, OR 97266

503-928-3998

Monday to Friday: 7:00am - 8:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am - 3:00pm

Corvallis Location

887 NW Grant Ave
Corvallis, OR 97330

541-714-5620

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Saturday: 9:00am - 4:00pm

Eugene Location

401 E 10th Ave,
Suite 330
Eugene, OR 97401

541-868-2004

Monday to Friday: 8:00am - 8:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am - 3:00pm

https://www.eugenetherapy.com/