First Date Ideas for Singles with Anxiety

Date: October 8th, 2019

Filed under: Relationships

First dates can be anxiety-inducing for anybody, but they can be particularly difficult if you struggle with anxiety on a regular basis. Spending time with someone you don’t know well, keeping up a conversation, making a good impression—it can all feel overwhelming. But dating gives you a chance to make friends, try new things, and maybe even find romance, all of which are great for your mental and emotional health. So before you decide to stay in with a movie and a tub of ice cream, give one of these low-stress date ideas a try.

Double Date

Having others around to share the talking can help you relax and enjoy yourself, rather than spending the entire evening trying to avoid the dreaded “awkward silence.”

Skip Dinner and Catch the Show

Dinner and a movie may have the advantage of being tried-and-true, but making small talk, deciding on what to order, and eating in front of someone else can all amp up your anxiety. Plan to see the show, and if you feel like grabbing dessert afterwards, the movie provides a built-in conversation starter.

Volunteer

Focusing on something besides your partner while on a date might seem counterintuitive, but keeping busy can actually help both of you to open up, talk naturally, and maybe even have a few laughs. Plus it’s a great opportunity to help others and find out what causes your date is passionate about.

Board Games

If you’re looking for an evening in, a game night can be a fun and simple way for the two of you to get to know each other in a fun, low-pressure environment.

Attend an Interesting Event or Location

Festivals, plays, art museums, zoos—they all provide an interesting backdrop to your date. If it’s a new experience for both of you, so much the better. The two of you can share something new together and use the novel experience to jumpstart the conversation if it starts to flag.

While first dates aren’t easy for people with anxiety, choosing a low-stress activity can make it more likely that you’ll enjoy them. If your anxiety makes dating or relationships challenging, consider talking to one of our counselors or therapists. They can help you learn how to manage your anxiety so you can get to know others in fulfilling ways.

3 Ways to Build Your Self-Confidence

Date: September 24th, 2019

Filed under: Tips

For some people, self-confidence seems to come naturally, but for most of us, it’s a character trait we have to develop. There are many ways to build your self-confidence, from improving your posture to trying something new every day, and from reciting affirmations to using visualization techniques. You can use the three tips below as a starting point to building your self-confidence.

Present Your Best Self

Self-confidence is largely a matter of personal perception—convincing yourself that you are the kind of person you want to be. To truly believe this, you have to act like it. Take some time to do some soul-searching, and ask yourself questions like, What are my strengths? What kind of personality do I have? What kind of person would I like to be? Whatever your answers are, use them to help you visualize your best self, and then behave like that kind of person.

Build Meaningful Skills

Perceiving yourself as competent and knowing that you can do the things that are important to you is a big part of self-confidence. Identify a skill that’s important to you and work on developing it. It doesn’t matter what skill you choose, as long as it has meaning for you. You might decide to take an art class, join a Toastmasters club, devote half an hour each day to knitting, or study mechanics. As your knowledge and competence grows, so will your self-confidence.

Help Someone Else

Altruism has all kinds of benefits for your self-confidence, emotional well-being, and even physical health. Helping someone else can take the form of volunteering with an organization you believe in, donating to a good cause, or teaching someone a new skill. It can also be more casual. When you text a friend, recommend a great book, or give someone a ride, you’re helping them and building your own self-confidence at the same time.

Building self-confidence is a rewarding endeavor and can benefit you in many ways. As your self-confidence grows you will be more positive, experience better mental and emotional health, and feel happier, knowing that you are the kind of person you truly want to be.

How to Cultivate a Healthy Relationship with Social Media

Date: September 11th, 2019

Filed under: Tips

Like many other aspects of our lives, social media isn’t good or bad in and of itself—it’s how we use it that determines whether it helps us or hurts us. Since social media is an integral part of many people’s social lives, jobs, and educational endeavors, it’s important to know how to cultivate a healthy relationship with it. Use these tips to help you make sure that your social media use has a positive impact on your mental and emotional health.

Limit Social Media Time

Decide how much time you want to spend on social media, and limit yourself to a set number of minutes or a particular time each day. If you find yourself losing track of how long you’ve been online, set an alarm to remind you when it’s time to log off. Make a special effort to avoid social media right before bed, or when you’re spending time with others.

Have a Purpose when Checking Social Media

Before you sign on, decide what you want to accomplish. Maybe you want to see the photos from a family member’s vacation, wish your friend a happy birthday, or doublecheck the location of a social event. Having a purpose when checking social media can help you avoid getting distracted by posts that aren’t meaningful to you.

Don’t Compare Yourself to Others

Remember that people usually post exciting and fun moments, and that what you see on social media isn’t representative of their whole lives. Chances are, they struggle with many of the same things you do. Celebrate the good times in the lives of others, and only follow and friend people whose posts uplift and encourage you.

Be Honest with Yourself

The only person who truly knows how social media affects you is yourself. Social media can become a habit, so before you spend time online, check in with yourself to see if that’s really what you want to do. If you’d rather go for a walk, read a book, call a friend, or bake a treat—make those experiences your priority. And if you find that you’re struggling to cultivate a healthy relationship with social media, feel free to reach out to a member of our team for support. We’re here to help!

Back to School Tips for Kids

Date: August 21st, 2019

Filed under: Kids

It’s hard to believe that summer is almost over and the season of scholastics is about to begin. Even as you and your family enjoy the last few days of freedom, you can help your child get ready for the coming academic year by following these simple back to school tips for kids.

Start Your Routine Now

If your usual schedule has fallen to the wayside over the summer, a couple of weeks before school starts is the perfect time to get back into the swing of things. Get your child used to a school-year bedtime and morning routine before summer is over, so that the adjustment is easy, natural, and already in place when the new term begins.

Reconnect with Friends

Having a buddy to hang out with can ease back-to-school anxiety and help your child look forward to heading back to class. Families get busy over the summer, so if your child has lost touch with old school friends, set up a play date or help them make plans to meet at recess on the first day of school.

Visit the School Early

The unknown can be scary, so if this is your child’s first year at a new school, helping them get familiar with the new environment beforehand can boost their confidence. Many schools provide an open house or meet-the-teacher night at the end of summer. If your school doesn’t have this type of program in place, see if you can visit the school on your own so your child knows where they’ll be picked up and dropped off, where their classroom is, and what the playground looks like.

By being proactive about preparing your child for school, you can help them adjust more easily, cope well with anxiety, and even look forward to the new school year.

Self-Care for Family Caregivers

Date: August 7th, 2019

Filed under: Tips

Did you know that in general, people who act as family caregivers are less likely than others to practice self-care? As a caregiver, one of the most important things you can do for both yourself and the person you’re caring for is to take good care of yourself.

Take Care of Your Own Health

Caring for someone else doesn’t mean your own health should take a back seat. Be sure to make regular doctor’s appointments for yourself, and talk to your physician about any concerns you have. Set goals to take care of your own basic needs, like eating nutritious meals and snacks, getting enough sleep, and exercising.

Practice Stress-Reduction Techniques

Caregiving can be stressful, taking a toll on your mental, emotional, and physical health. Learn and apply techniques like meditation, yoga, and mindfulness to keep yourself centered. Other options to help you relax could include coloring, journaling, taking a bath, or scheduling a power nap into your day.

Do Something You Love

Your personal happiness has a huge effect on your quality of life and the level of care you are able to give to others, so make time to do things that you enjoy. Go to lunch with a friend, spend time on your favorite hobby, or treat yourself to something special.

Ask for Help

The burden of caregiving can be lightened when you share it with others. Family and friends are often willing to help, but may not know what to do. Making specific requests—such as asking someone to make a meal or run a few errands—can make your day more manageable. You may also want to consider professional help. It’s an investment, but it can come with significant benefits to your well-being.

Take time off

It’s important to give yourself a break from the demands of caregiving. Make arrangements to have someone else take care of your loved one for a while so you can have some time off. You’ll come back feeling refreshed and more able to cope with your caregiving responsibilities.

Self-care is a vital part of being a family caregiver. Taking care of yourself allows you to be a better caregiver to your loved one, stay healthy, and enjoy all that life has to offer.

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Contact Oregon Counseling

To request an appointment please complete the form below. Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment. After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule an appointment. Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider these emergency options:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • call 911
  • Go to your nearest emergency room.
  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

  • To request an appointment please complete the form below.
  • Next, an intake coordinator will email you a link with a questionnaire for you to complete regarding your goals for treatment.
  • After that questionnaire is completed, you will be contacted via phone to schedule.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please consider the following resources:

  • Call the National Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255
  • Text HOME to 741741
  • Call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room

Please note we do not accept Trillium/OHP, Medicare or Tricare/Triwest insurance.

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